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What is the ColonoscopyAssist Program About?

  • The ColonoscopyAssist program provides colonoscopy screenings and colon cancer support for the underinsured community.
  • The program offers 4 tests at a heavily discounted rate :
    1. Colonoscopy
    2. Upper Endoscopy
    3. Cologuard (DNA Test)
    4. FIT Tests (Stool Test)
  • Interest Free Payment Plan Options are available for patients unable to afford a test.
  • Screenings are provided completely free of charge in certain regions where funding is available.
  • Support and help is provided for patients diagnosed with colon cancer.

Learn About Colon Cancer


Please note: The information on this website is provided by ColonoscopyAssist™ for educational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical care or advice.

Treatment

Treatment depends partly on the stage of the cancer. In general, treatments may include:

  • Chemotherapy to kill cancer cells
  • Surgery (most often a colectomy) to remove cancer cells
  • Radiation therapy to destroy cancerous tissue

Stage 0 colon cancer may be treated by removing the cancer cells, often during a colonoscopy. For stages I, II, and III cancer, more extensive surgery is needed to remove the part of the colon that is cancerous. (See: Colon resection)

There is some debate as to whether patients with stage II colon cancer should receive chemotherapy after surgery. You should discuss this with your oncologist.

Almost all patients with stage III colon cancer should receive chemotherapy after surgery for approximately 6 - 8 months. The chemotherapy drug 5-fluorouracil has been shown to increase the chance of a cure in certain patients.

Chemotherapy is also used to treat patients with stage IV colon cancer to improve symptoms and prolong survival.

  • Irinotecan, oxaliplatin, capecitabine, and 5-fluorouracil are the three most commonly used drugs.
  • Monoclonal antibodies, including cetuximab (Erbitux), panitumumab (Vectibix), and bevacizumab (Avastin) have been used alone or in combination with chemotherapy.

You may receive just one type, or a combination of the drugs.

For patients with stage IV disease that has spread to the liver, various treatments directed specifically at the liver can be used. This may include:

  • Burning the cancer (ablation)
  • Cutting out the cancer
  • Delivering chemotherapy or radiation directly into the liver
  • Freezing the cancer (cryotherapy)

Although radiation therapy is occasionally used in patients with colon cancer, it is usually used in combination with chemotherapy for patients with stage III rectal cancer.


Call Us

If you have questions on colon cancer and how it can be prevented, call our office Monday to Friday between 9:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.